“Peace”

 

December 4, 2016 - Second Sunday in Advent

By Pastor Michael Cofer

You can tell Christmas is coming: eggnog is nestled hopefully in the dairy case at Kroger; you can’t find a parking spot in the same zip code as the mall and your calendar is overflowing with wonderful (if time consuming) holiday events. Kids in school are getting extra cagey as they anxiously await Christmas break. Travel plans are being made furiously and maybe you’ve got an extra-extra workload to make your upcoming Christmas vacation happen.

Life is full, hectic and maybe a little overwhelming. I think we’d all like to find a little peace for ourselves. Maybe some down time, a little quiet time, a little “me” time. Or, better yet, wouldn’t it be great if life just slowed down so you could handle it at a more reasonable pace?

But, maybe you’ve had this experience–I certainly have. You have a moment to rest and a quiet moment… but your brain won’t stop hounding you with the stuff that you could or need to be doing instead of resting… and even in the quiet, you don’t find peace.

There are a lot of things that can rob the peace we should have: busyness, anxiety, guilt, bitterness, anger. Know what all of them have in common? They aren’t out there. They’re in our hearts.

The more I thought about it, the more I’ve come to realize that peace isn’t something to be found. It’s something to be made…

Jesus is called the prince of peace. At his birth the angels said “peace on earth!” But those things weren’t incidentals that Jesus happened into. They were his mission. Jesus came to bring peace between God and man. He didn’t look for it. He didn’t wait for it. He came to make it.

You’ll remember that Jesus said, “blessed are the peacemakers.” He didn’t say, “blessed are the peace-finders.” You know what the difference is? Peacemakers make the first move. Peacemakers are the ones who humble themselves and put themselves in the vulnerable position.

Think for a moment how God could have made his entrance… He could have come with a host of sword-bearing seraphim in righteous retribution. Or, He could have shown forth in unveiled holiness as he did in the days of Moses and David – when to touch or even look at Him would mean instant death for sinners.

Instead he came as a tiny, precious baby born among pack animals and greeted by poor shepherds. It didn’t have to be this way; these were choices God and the message it sent was crystal clear: “I come in peace.”

That peace wasn’t going to just happen on its own. There was never going to be a morning when the world stumbled into peace with God. Even among God’s chosen people. Do you know that “Israel” means “struggles” or (more literally) “wrestles with God?” Peace with God doesn’t come naturally to us.

But that’s why Jesus came. That’s why He became one of us – to bridge the gulf between God and man. To deliver the message of God’s love and forgiveness and make peace. And that’s why He laid down His life – to bring an end to the conflict between God and man, to heal the mortal wound in our relationship with God that began with Adam and Eve.

And yet… the song the angels sang wasn’t about peace in Heaven, but “peace on earth and goodwill toward those on whom His favor rests.” The peace of Christ shouldn’t stop with our relationship to God, but it should spill into our relationships with our fellow man. How will that happen?

Do you suppose that we will find peace with our neighbor? Or will we need to make peace with them? If we follow the prince of peace, then we will learn about the humble joy of being peacemakers. And peacemakers make the first move. Peacemakers are the ones who humble themselves and put themselves in the vulnerable position.

What does that look like? It means being understanding and gracious when others have offended us… even if you have the right to be angry or bitter. Why would anyone ever want to exercise that right?! Instead, a peacemaker returns offense with love, kindness and forgiveness (even when it isn’t being sought). Peacemakers humble themselves, and admit their own mistakes and ask for forgiveness.

There is no peace with God without grace and forgiveness. And, you know what? The same is true for peace among men.

So, perhaps part of our Advent preparations should include some serious self -examination. Which of my relationships are broken and hurting? What unforgiven sins do I need to finally forgive? What bitterness and anger do I need to let go of? Who do I need to ask for forgiveness? Where are guilt and shame driving a wedge between God and me, or between my brother and me?

And let’s not stop at self-examination… because alone it won’t accomplish peace. Rather, let’s make the move to actually asking God and our neighbors for forgiveness. Let’s take the steps to mend our broken relationships. You won’t be received 100% successfully. Some folks don’t want to be forgiven. Some folks want to nurse the grudge and cling to the hurt. You might not be able to help that. Jesus faced the same thing, you know. That’s okay. Still, he made the first move. And even to those who rejected Him, He never withdrew his offer of grace. And that’s the call for us. In Romans 13 it says, “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.”

You know, an interesting thing happens when you are a peacemaker–you will have peace. Even in those relationships where they don’t want to forgive or be forgiven… If you are the peacemaker, then you will lay down the burden of those sins. Your love and compassion for the other person will grow, as you see how it hurts them to carry the hurt around. But you will have peace–peace that goes well beyond what seems possible… because the peace we have to offer is nothing other than the same peace we have received in Christ. The grace and forgiveness we have in Him is sure and certain and inexhaustible. He made the first move and humbled himself to make peace, and that’s what we celebrate on Christmas.

Lord, make me an instrument of Your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy. O, Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love; For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; it is in dying that we are born again to eternal life.                       (St. Francis)

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